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If your hearing aid gets wet

If your hearing aid gets wet DON’T PANIC! Electronics and water are two things that generally don’t go well together but all is not lost if your aid does get a soaking. I’ve had several that have been waterlogged and have managed to get them working fully again.

Things to do if your hearing aid gets wet

  1. Remove the aid from the water as quickly as possible – the less water that’s in it in the first place, the better chance it has to work again.
  2. Turn it off straight away and remove the battery. Throw the battery in the bin. Don’t be tempted to wait and see if it comes straight back on – turn it off as soon as possible.
  3. Close the battery door, remove the tube (if you have one) and dry gently with a towel. Shake it gently to try and get as much water out as possible.
  4. Use a hairdryer or a fan to blow-dry it. It’s very important not to let the aid get too hot so don’t use a hair-dryer on a high-heat – use a low-heat and keep the dryer some distance away from the aid. Excessive heat is much worse for electronics than a brief dunk in water. Blow-drying will speed up the dry-out time but you can skip this step if you are worried about the heat or don’t have a fan.
  5. Leave the aid to dry out. The amount of time to leave it will depend on how wet it was. I’ve had to leave an aid for two days before it completely dried out. Leave it sitting with the battery door open so that as much air as possible can get it. Better still, place it in a dehumidifier pot – this will speed up the dry-out considerably.
  6. Once you are happy that the aid is dried, put in a fresh battery and try it out. You can also use one of the cleaning tools you received with your aid to make sure the water has not left any residue behind but be very careful poking tools inside your aid.
  7. If the aid still does not work then you can either recharge your dehumidifier pot and leave it a while longer or ask your audiologist to send it back for repair.

What not to do

  1. Never put your hearing aid into a microwave or conventional oven. It’s too much heat and you’ll melt something.
  2. Don’t just assume it’s broken. Give it time to dry and then get it sent away for repair if you need to.

The important thing to remember is: It is unlikely that you will need to buy a new hearing aid just because it got soaked – electronics are more resilient to water than most people think.

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9 comments
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  1. Very useful post, Steve!

  2. [...] If your hearing aid gets wet [...]

  3. [...] If your hearing aid gets wet [...]

  4. [...] If your hearing aid gets wet [...]

  5. [...] Steve’s post, “If your hearing aids get wet”  I dried the outside of my hearing aid with a towel, removed my ear mould from the aid, then [...]

  6. A hearing aid, like most electronic devices, should be kept away from water. But if you lead an active life, your hearing aid might get wet by accident. You may also forget to take off your hearing aid before taking a shower.
    If your hearing aid gets wet, here is some advice for you:
    * Switch off your hearing aid immediately.
    * Remove the battery from the hearing aid. Dry the battery meticulously with a dry cloth.
    * Shake the hearing aid to remove all possible water. Before shaking it, make sure that the battery compartment is open.
    * Place your hearing aid on a newspaper, placed on a moderately warm radiator for some hours with the battery compartment open.

  7. A hearing aid, like most electronic devices, should be kept away from water. But if you lead an active life, your hearing aid might get wet by accident. You may also forget to take off your hearing aid before taking a shower.
    If your hearing aid gets wet, here is some advice for you:
    * Switch off your hearing aid immediately.
    * Remove the battery from the hearing aid. Dry the battery meticulously with a dry cloth.
    * Shake the hearing aid to remove all possible water. Before shaking it, make sure that the battery compartment is open.
    * Place your hearing aid on a newspaper, placed on a moderately warm radiator for some hours with the battery compartment open.
    hearing clinics

  8. Thanks a lot for this. As it’s the hottest day of the year and I have a stupid amount of hair I’ve been sweating a lot and it got into Jeeves (my right hearing aid, the left being Wooster) And it’s gone and shorted him out for a while. I was doing everything you said in your article except for removing the battery (obvious when you think about it really) But it’s good too know I’m on the right lines.

    Now I just have to learn how to sweat less.

    Danny

  9. I’ve worn hearing aids for 30 years, and for most of that time, have stayed away from water sports, because if I have to remove them for swimming, or if they become wet in a boat, etc., I cannot hear a thing. My hearing is 80% gone, and wearing Aids are vital for me to function in the world.

    Recently, I decided to at least try kayaking, and have taken 3 LL Bean short courses. I’ve been fortunate in being able to stay on the water rather than in the water for those sessions. However, I’m apprehensive about continuing, because sooner or later, I may find my head underwater.

    Do any of you go kayaking and wear hearing aids? If so, how do you provide for the eventuality of capsizing?
    Thank you,
    Will

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